Thursday, April 30, 2015

National Right to Life urges Congress to pass H. J. Res. 43, prolife groups shouldn’t be forced to hire pro-abortion activists

National Right to Life Committee is urging members of Congress to vote in favor of H.J. Res. 43 which would nullify pro-abortion legislation passed by the District of Columbia.  The pro-abortion legislation in question could force prolife organizations in the District of Columbia to hire pro-abortion employees. 

In a letter to legislators, National Right to Life’s legislative team writes:

The RHNDA prohibits employers within the District from engaging in "discrimination" on the basis of "decisions" reached by employees, or potential employees, regarding "reproductive health" matters.  It is not disputed that abortion is among the matters encompassed by the term "reproductive health" as used in the new law.  The scope of the RHNDA is very broad, covering any "decisions" that are "related to the use . . . of a particular . . . medical service . . ." [emphasis added]

The National Right to Life Committee (NRLC) advocates for recognition that each unborn child is a member of the human family, and that each abortion stops a beating heart and ends the life of a developing human being.  That viewpoint is shared by many women who once believed otherwise and submitted to abortions, and by many men who once believed otherwise and were complicit in abortion; such persons number among the most committed activists within our organization and other pro-life organizations.  Yet it would be intolerable for an advocacy organization such as ours to be required to hire, or prohibited from firing, a person who makes a "decision" to engage in advocacy or any other activity that is directly antithetical to our core mission to lawfully advocate for the civil rights of the unborn. 

Under the RHNDA, using any "decision . . . related to" abortion to inform decisions about hiring, firing, or benefits (among other things) would expose our organization both to enforcement actions by the District government bureaucracy, and to private lawsuits (some of which would likely be engendered by "sting" operations by pro-abortion advocates).